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FRIDAY, JULY 25, 2014

Posts Tagged ‘Kaboni Savage’

kidadi sav
AN ANGRY Kidada Savage – sister of Kaboni – wanted her sentencing

hearing delayed yesterday. She claimed she needed a new lawyer.

“This is BS,” whispered Eugene Coleman – whose mother, 15-month-

old son and four other relatives, including three other children,

were killed in a firebombing.

The Oct. 9, 2004, firebombing that Kaboni Savage ordered from

prison torched Coleman’s mother’s home in North Philadelphia.

Coleman had once been Savage’s associate, but had agreed to test-

ify against him in a federal drug-racketeering case. The arson kill-

ing was Savage’s revenge.

Kidada Savage, 31, helped plot the arson. She was convicted in May

of six counts of murder in aid of racketeering, retaliating against

a witness and related offenses.

She faced a mandatory sentence of life in prison plus 10 years.

After denying her request to delay sentencing, U.S. District Judge

R. Barclay Surrick imposed the required sentence and said: “I have

not heard any remorse from you.”

“Quite frankly, the nature of this crime was barbaric,” the judge

said. “The crime was horrendous. . . . I don’t know how you could

live with yourself.”

“Not guilty, your honor, that’s how!” Conchetta Savage, Kidada’s

older sister, shouted from the gallery. After a U.S. Marshal

approached her, the sister left the courtroom.

Earlier, Kidada Savage herself claimed to the judge that she had

nothing to do with the killings. “Your honor, I was railroaded,”

she said. “The system is unjust.

“I would never hurt anybody regardless of that guilt verdict. I

know I did nothing wrong,” she said. “I will fight to the end because

it’s not true.”

Assistant U.S. Attorney David Troyer told the judge that Kidada’s

role in the firebombing deaths “was essential.” She reached out to

Lamont Lewis, the hit man hired by her brother to carry out the

firebombing. She showed Lewis the Coleman house.

Lewis got his cousin, Robert Merritt, involved, and both went to

the house with gas cans to torch it.

Kidada “chose to be a murderer of children,” Troyer said. He also

told the judge that Kaboni, 39, tried to help his sister delay her

sentencing.

Housed in the “supermax” prison in Florence, Colo., facing the

death penalty, Kaboni had spoken by phone on Thursday with

Conchetta. “Get the names of attorneys, but don’t pay anyone,”

Kaboni said, according to Troyer.

Troyer told the judge that Kidada was “manipulating the system”

by trying to delay her sentence. The judge agreed.

Defense lawyer Teresa Whalen told the judge that Kidada grew

up in a house that was the center of her brother’s drug dealing.

Her family had strong bonds of love and trust, and whatever

Kaboni told Kidada to do, she did.

“The greatest punishment” for Kidada is being moved from the

Federal Detention Center in Philadelphia, where she is close to

her family, Whalen said. Lewis, who cooperated with the feds,

and Merritt, still face sentencing.

Related posts:

Kaboni Savage Death Penalty
A federal jury has recommended the death penalty for a Philadelphia drug

kingpin convicted of killing a dozen people, including six relatives of an in-

formant.

Kaboni Savage is already serving 30 years for drug trafficking.

Jurors on Friday unanimously returned 13 death sentences against Savage —

one for each of the 12 murders and one for intimidating a witness. He didn’t

visibly react when the verdicts were read.

The sentencing will be formally imposed on Monday morning.

The jury found Savage ordered the 2004 firebombing of the informant’s fam-

ily from prison. Federal prosecutors arguing for the death penalty said prison

cannot contain Savage’s rage.

The arson killed two women and four children.

The 38-year-old is a former boxer.

Related posts:

Kaboni Savage

Jurors return to federal court in Philadelphia on Tuesday to hear arguments and evidence on whether a drug dealer convicted in the deaths of a dozen people should be sentenced to death or to life in prison without possibility of parole.

The panel last week convicted 38-year-old Kaboni Savage of the slayings, including a 2004 firebombing that killed six relatives of a man who was planning to testify against him. Court officials said penalty phase proceedings scheduled for Monday would be delayed a day.

Authorities said that although Savage has mostly been in prison since 2003, he gave orders through phone calls and prison visits and communicated with other inmates through prison plumbing pipes.

His 30-year-old sister, Kidada Savage, faces life in prison after being convicted in the firebombing the killed the mother of the prospective witness as well as another woman and four children.

Kaboni Savage, a former boxer who has denied any role in the attacks, is serving a 30-year drug trafficking sentence. Defense attorneys portrayed him as a drug dealer but not a kingpin and attacked the credibility of prosecution witnesses.

Co-defendant Steven Northington was convicted of two counts of murder in aid of racketeering and could face the death penalty in penalty phase deliberations.

Another defendant, 32-year-old Robert Merritt, was convicted of racketeering conspiracy but acquitted of charges in the firebombing.

Related posts:

Kaboni Savage

A drug dealer has been found guilty in the deaths of a dozen people, including a 2004 firebombing that killed six relatives of someone suspected of being an informant.

Jurors in federal court deliberated for a week before convicting 38-year-old Kaboni Savage on Monday. Prosecutors are seeking the death penalty, and penalty phase deliberations are scheduled to begin next week.

Authorities said that although Savage has mostly been in prison since 2003, he gave orders through phone calls and prison visits and communicated with other inmates through prison plumbing pipes.

His 30-year-old sister, Kidada Savage, faces life in prison after being convicted in connection with the firebombing of the home of a man who planned to testify against her brother. The firebombing killed the man’s mother, another woman and four children.

Co-defendant Steven Northington was convicted of two counts of murder in aid of racketeering and could face the death penalty in penalty phase deliberations next week.

Kaboni Savage, a former boxer who has denied any role in the attacks, is serving a 30-year drug trafficking sentence. Defense attorneys portrayed him as a drug dealer but not a kingpin and attacked the credibility of prosecution witnesses.

Jurors convicted the Savages, Northington and another defendant, 32-year-old Robert Merritt, of racketeering conspiracy but acquitted Merritt of charges in the firebombing. His attorney Williams Spade, told The Philadelphia Inquirer that he was gratified by the acquittals but was struggling to understand the conviction.

The newspaper said Kaboni Savage’s attorney, Christian Hoey, declined to comment after the verdict. Kidada Savage’s attorney, Christopher Phillips, also declined to comment, and an attorney for Northington did not immediately return a message seeking comment.

Related posts:

Kaboni Savage case

Jurors at the federal murder and racketeering trial of accused drug kingpin

Kaboni Savage closed their first week of deliberations without a verdict.

U.S. District Judge R. Barclay Surrick discharged the nine women and three

men early Friday afternoon after five days of talks without any signals of

their progress.

The group had only a few evidence requests over the week, including one

for a transcript of testimony by Lamont Lewis, the admitted killer who said

Savage directed him in October 2004 to firebomb the North Philadelphia

home of a former gang associate cooperating with the FBI.

Two adults and four children died in the fire, which officials have called one

of the worst cases of witness retaliation in city history. Savage, 38, is charged

with those deaths and six more, five of whom were rival drug dealers. If he is

convicted, prosecutors will ask jurors for the death penalty.  Savage’s lawyers

contend the charges are overblown and unproven, built on questionable testi-

mony by admitted criminals and informants out to save themselves. Under

his plea deal, Lewis will be spared the death penalty but faces 40 years in pri-

son.

Also on trial are Savage’s sister, Kidada, who is accused of helping to plot the

fire; Robert Merritt Jr., who allegedly assisted Lewis in the firebombing; and

Steven Northington, an alleged enforcer in Savage’s crew accused in another

homicide.

Merritt and Northington also could face death-penalty hearings if convicted.

Kidada Savage faces up to life in prison.

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